John Bosma - Mountain Shoot Profile

Landscape photography is all about capturing an image that embodies the spirit of the outdoors. When a viewer looks at your work, they should feel the same way you felt when you were there taking the photo.

Great landscape photography revolves around three factors: (1) finding a great location, (2) being there at the right time, and then (3) waiting for the precise moment when the light and environment are at their absolute best. While very few people want to wake up at 3AM to see a place at its most beautiful, that’s how great work gets created.

If all goes well, you will manage to capture the perfect moment when it feels as though no other point in time could express the essence of the event so perfect.


Our Instructional Philosophy

Landscape photography workshops are often (and justifiably) criticized for simply herding a bunch of people around from one location to another with everyone taking the same exact photos. I know that I’ve certainly had my fill of “master” level workshops where the itinerary I paid to experience never happened, anyone willing to pay the tuition was allowed into the course, the classroom teaching and instructional time never materialized, with the one-on-one mentoring nothing more than just an illusion. You deserve better!

Our workshops are all about photography. Your photography. The majority of our days will start early, before sunrise. After a quick cup of coffee or tea, we’ll be off to get into position at a location in the best light of the day, and we’ll often continue until mid-to-late morning. We’ll typically have breakfast in the field, in order to maximize our shooting time.

Out in the field, we’ll explore different approaches to scene visualization, ground/sky/sea compositions, and how to manage complex highlight and shadow scenes using techniques such as dynamic bracketing, focus stacking, framing, and neutral density filters. Back in the classroom, we’ll spend time developing your post-production workflow – learning when Lightroom is enough and when you need to move your work into Photoshop – using techniques such as luminosity masks to create and solve contrast, color, and blending issues.

You’ll benefit from our guidance, hours of capture time in the field with an experienced mentor by your side, and classroom instruction as you learn new techniques and strategies for creating dynamic images.


John Bosma, Your Photographic Leader

 

As an artist, I always strive to “capture the moment” – whether I am shooting a morning sunrise, an intimate portrait, or a live sporting event – composing the image in such a way that the viewer can actually experience both the intensity and emotion of the moment.

John Bosma Headshot

John Bosma is an award-winning landscape and fine art photographer. An avid hiker and mountain climber, many of John’s landscape photos have come from those adventures, or as a colleague once said, John takes great photos. It’s just that none of them are below 10,000 feet!

Images from his work in Death Valley National Park were recently displayed as part of the 100 Years of the National Park Service at The G2 Gallery in Los Angeles. Deserts are often perceived to be hot, barren regions void of all life. In the intense heat and harsh light of the day, the desert can appear colorless and lifeless. But during the sunrise and twilight hours of the day, the rich textures and patterns of the canyons, dry washes, and sand dunes come alive in the golden light. John’s work captures those brief moments when both the intensity and emotion of the desert have come alive.

Works from his fine arts collection, Abandoned Dreams, were displayed in an exhibition in March 2015 at the Los Angeles Center of Photography (LACP). Man’s pursuit of his dreams – and the abandonment of those dreams – is a timeless theme that has permeated both literature and art throughout the ages. Having a dream can change the course of an individual’s life, create a passion for living, and fuel the ambition needed to pursue the dream. Abandoned Dreams is an exploration of this phenomenon in a contemporary setting.

His work has also been displayed in a variety of museums and galleries, some of which include the Griffin Museum of Photography in Boston, MA; the Amanda Smith Gallery in Johnson City, TX; the Los Angeles Center of Photography (LACP); the Los Angeles Center for Digital Art (LACDA); and the LENSCRATCH Fine Art Photography Daily.

In addition to his landscape and fine arts photography, John is an accomplished sports photographer. He is an official photographer for the Long Beach Toyota Grand Prix, the World Police & Fire Games, the California Firefighters Olympics, the Rob Fukuzaki Heads-Up Youth Foundation Annual Charity Golf Tournament, NCAA, Code 3 Athletics, Battleground Events, and various other organizations in the Los Angeles area. His commercial and editorial photographs have been featured in publications and online magazines, his official portraits of CrossFit athletes have been sold worldwide, and his images have appeared in numerous advertising and marketing campaigns.

John also conducts a variety of travel photography workshops and classes on camera & lighting technique, Adobe Photoshop Lightroom, and Adobe Photoshop. Born in the US Midwest, John has lived in Canada, spent time in Europe, and resided in Los Angeles since 2008.